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DETROIT NATIVE SUN
DETROIT NATIVE SUN
Hair Talk with JoJo
The Hair Care Expert
Q. JoJo I’ve been using moisturizing shampoo and moisturizing conditioner all summer, and my dry hair and scalp has been doing good, but now my scalp is getting dry and flaky. Can the change of season be doing this? If so, what should i be doing differently?
A. You’ve got it! The changing seasons going from summer to fall and into winter will dry the scalp and hair. Moisturizing shampoos help, switching to sulfate free shampoo’s and conditioners can also help. This time of year I recommend adding the Rosemary Mint shampoo and conditioner by Influence to your hair care arsenal. The rosemary mint combination stimulates and help activate the scalp and oil glands.
Q. Hey Mr. JoJo I’m a 50-year-old cosmetologist. I haven’t worked in a salon in over 30 years. I’ve kept my license current, and I have some family members who’s hair I do so I’ve kept my skills decent. My question is if I wanted to try to work in a salon is there a place for stylist like me? I can’t weave. I can do basic hair, shampoo, press and curl, and perms but most people have gotten out of perms. What I’m saying is I’m not good enough to rent a chair or suite. I need to be where I can learn and grow. I’m a young 50 and doing hair has always been my passion.
A. I do understand, and yes a lot of salons are hiring older stylists. Finding the right salon for you may take some work. Atmosphere is very important. Older stylists usually have a older cliental and older clients aren’t attracted to the same atmosphere as younger clients. Music and language can be a factor. Commission salons are hard to find these days. They work good for newer stylists who don’t have a cliental and can’t afford to pay booth rent while only servicing 5 clients. The senior stylists help and oversee the newer stylists, at least that’s how I do it.
Q. JoJo I just took my braids down after 3 months, and I have a patch on one side that’s 2 inches shorter than the other side. How long should I be keeping my braids in and can braids break your hair off like that?
A. Usually braid wearers need their ends trimmed after taking braids out that’s normal, but if they’re done too tight the damage and thinness will be at the scalp. A common practice in removing braids is to cut them half way down guessing where your hair is, and we sometimes cut our hair, so be careful.
  Note: Don’t allow your age to stop you from living your dreams. I’ve talked to several salon owners who would welcome older hair and wig stylists - me included drop me a line I’ll forward your info and remember whenever your hair is on your mind drop JoJo a line.  
  Terry’s Place is the largest black-owned wig salon in Detroit. We want to take your look to the next level. When you look good, we look good. Visit Terry’s Place online at www.terryswigsandlashes.com or on Facebook. Email [email protected] or stop by Terry’s Place at 19139 Livernois Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48221. Please call (313)863-4014.  

PRNewswire/ -- Today, African Pride, leading haircare product manufacturer with more than 30 years' experience creating quality and affordable products, unveiled a new #TakePrideAndVote campaign in partnership with Tina Lawson, businesswoman, cosmetologist and ambassador for And Still I Vote, a national call to action spearheaded by The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, to empower Black and Brown communities across the country to take back the vote this November 2020.
    For years, decision makers nationwide have passed laws making it harder to cast a ballot – especially for people of color. In every corner of the country, policymakers have put up discriminatory barriers for these targeted communities and African Pride customers to shut them out for voting right. From closing polling locations in Black neighborhoods early, turning registered voters away for lack of proper identification check in to wrongfully erasing voters from the rolls – low-income families, seniors and college students – they are taking away the people's right to vote and rigging the system. Thankfully, Ms. Tina Lawson has been an advocate for the HEROES Act, helping provide economic relief and protecting the rights of all registered voters and families in our Black and Brown communities during these difficult times. 
• 17 Million people were purged from voter rolls between 2016 and 2018
• 6 Million people were denied the right to vote in 2016 due to a previous felony charge
• 25 states, half of the states in the country, have enacted voting restrictions in the last decade
  "We understand that 2020 is a critical election year," said Kendria Strong, EVP of Marketing & Innovation at African Pride. "It's now time to empower our communities to take action and impact change by increasing voter registration and elevating voices. Together with Ms. Tina Lawson, ambassador for And Still I Vote, African Pride is committed to creating a platform that inspires and motivates generations."
  Kicking off the 5-month-long campaign today, and leading up to Election Day this November 3, 2020, the brand will host celebrity Instagram Lives with Ms. Tina Lawson titled, "Talks with Mama Tina," to empower Black communities by arming them with the knowledge, tools and influence to make every single one of our votes count. The educational series will also share key voting statistics from And Still I Vote, along with important dates to know such as the 55th Anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and National Voter Registration Day, and much more.
  "I'm happy to be in partnership with African Pride," said Tina Lawson. "They are helping to change the narrative and elevate Black voices, reminding us that our vote and our voice matters. We have to connect these dots for our community."
  African Pride's #TakePrideAndVote campaign is call to action to encourage people from across the country to join the voting rights movement and impact real change. Coming together with our Black and Brown community, we can now be properly armed with the tools needed to get to the polls this fall.
  It's time for a democracy where every eligible voter can cast a ballot and have it counted. Join us on Instagram to learn how you and your vote can effect real change. For additional information on the #TakePrideAndVote campaign, upcoming "Talks with Mama Tina Presented by African Pride," the African Pride brand or products visit AfricanPrideHair.com and follow #TakePrideAndVote and @MyAfricanPride on Instagram and Twitter and @MyAfricanPrideHair on Facebook.


African Pride joins voting rights movement with Tina Lawson